"the home automation system designed by loren amelang himself" by "Nicolás Boullosa" on Flickr

One to read: Ansible for Networking – Part 3: Cisco IOS

One to read: “Ansible for Networking – Part 3: Cisco IOS”

One of the guest hosts and stalwart member of the Admin Admin Telegram group has been documenting how he has built his Ansible Networking lab.

Stuart has done three posts so far, but this is the first one actually dealing with the technology. It’s a mammoth read, so I’d recommend doing it on a computer, and not on a tablet or phone!

Posts one and two were about what the series would cover and how the lab has been constructed.

Featured image is “the home automation system designed by loren amelang himself” by “Nicolás Boullosa” on Flickr and is released under a CC-BY license.

One to read: Testing Ansible roles with Molecule

One to read: “Testing Ansible roles with Molecule”

This is a good brief summary of Molecule – the default testing product for Ansible (it’s now a product that the Ansible project maintains). This post also makes reference to TestInfra which is another project I need to look in to.

TestInfra really is the more interesting piece (although Molecule is interesting too), because it’s how you check exactly what is on a host. Here’s an example snippet of code (from the front page of that site’s documentation):

def test_passwd_file(host):
    passwd = host.file("/etc/passwd")
    assert passwd.contains("root")
    assert passwd.user == "root"
    assert passwd.group == "root"
    assert passwd.mode == 0o644


def test_nginx_is_installed(host):
    nginx = host.package("nginx")
    assert nginx.is_installed
    assert nginx.version.startswith("1.2")


def test_nginx_running_and_enabled(host):
    nginx = host.service("nginx")
    assert nginx.is_running
    assert nginx.is_enabled

See how easily this clearly defines what your server should look like – it’s got a file called /etc/passwd owned by root with specific permissions, and that the file contains the word root in it, likewise there is a package called nginx installed at version 1.2 and also it’s running and enabled… all good stuff, particularly from an infrastructure-as-code perspective. Now, I just need to go away and test this stuff with more diverse backgrounds than just a stock Ubuntu machine :)