One to read: Walking the DWeb walk

One to read: “Walking the DWeb walk”

I recently was doing some research for my appearance on TechSNAP, and could have done with finding this link before I recorded the show. It’s a great summary of how to put your website on IPFS. Definitely worth a look!

This was automatically posted from my RSS Reader, and may be edited later to add commentary.

One to read: A Beginner’s Guide to IPFS

One to read: “A Beginner’s Guide to IPFS”

Ever wondered about IPFS (the “Inter Planetary File System”) – a new way to share and store content. This doesn’t rely on a central server (e.g. Facebook, Google, Digital Ocean, or your home NAS) but instead uses a system like bittorrent combined with published records to keep the content in the system.

If your host goes down (where the original content is stored) it’s also cached on other nodes who have visited your site.

These caches are cleared over time, so are suitable for short outages, or you can have other nodes who “pin” your content (and this can be seen as a paid solution that can fund hosts).

IPFS is great at hosting static content, but how to deal with dynamic content? That’s where PubSub comes into play (which isn’t in this article). There’s a database service which sits on IPFS and uses PubSub to sync data content across the network, called Orbit-DB.

It’s looking interesting, especially in light of the announcement from CloudFlare about their introduction of an available IPFS gateway.

It’s looking good for IPFS!

This was automatically posted from my RSS Reader, and may be edited later to add commentary.

One to read: Overview of TLS v1.3

One to read: “Overview of TLS v1.3”

Wondering what TLS v1.3 means to your web browsing? OWASP break it down into what the differences are between TLS1.2 and TLS1.3. It’s a really good set of slides and would be great if you need so show someone some of the moving pieces without reading the RFS (RFC8446). It’s good :)

This was automatically posted from my RSS Reader, and may be edited later to add commentary.

One to read: Automating backups on a Raspberry Pi NAS

One to read: “Automating backups on a Raspberry Pi NAS”

human head, brain outlined with computer hardware background

In the first part of this three-part series using a Raspberry Pi for network-attached storage (NAS), we covered the fundamentals of the NAS setup, attached two 1TB hard drives (one for data and one for backups), and mounted the data drive on a remote device via the network filesystem (NFS). In part two, we will look at automating backups. Automated backups allow you to continually secure your data and recover from a hardware defect or accidental file removal.

read more

This was automatically posted from my RSS Reader, and may be edited later to add commentary.