"Money" by "Images Money" on Flickr

One to listen to: “Salary Negotiation for DevOps with Josh Doody”

A few weeks ago, during a podcast binge, I came across this podcast (Salary Negotiations for DevOps with Josh Doody on the Real World DevOps Podcast). I noted at the time that it was really good content with great advice… and then forgot about it. (Oh, and it’s not just for DevOps people!)

Fast forward to today, when one of the Admin Admin Podcast Listeners (in our Telegram Channel) announces that he’s just gone for a new job, had been offered it, and was thinking of taking the job… but that they’d offered him a package lower than he was hoping to receive. My response “Say you wanted more, see if they can meet you halfway!” The main thing I took away from this podcast was that by the time you’re in the interview stage, the company you’re being interviewed by is *likely* to have already paid several thousand pounds/dollars/euros to have you sat in front of them, so if they want you, they’ll probably pay that bit more to not have to go through that process again!

Anyway, this is a great podcast for anyone who works for an employer, is thinking of asking for a pay rise‌ or is looking for a new job, and it’s well worth a listen!

Featured image is “Money” by “Images Money” on Flickr and is released under a CC-BY license.

Podcast Summary – “TechSNAP Episode 384: Interplanetary Peers”

Last night I was a guest host on TechSNAP, a systems, network and administration podcast.

The episode I recorded was: TechSNAP Episode 384: Interplanetary Peers

In this episode, I helped cover the news items, mostly talking about the breach over at NewEgg by the MagePay group and a (now fixed) vulnerability in Alpine Linux, and then did a bit of a dive into IPFS.

It’s a good listen, but the audio right at the end was quite noisy as a storm settled in just as I was recording my outro.

One to listen to: “Jason Scott is Breaking Out in Archives”

http://sysadministrivia.com/episodes/S3E13

This is a fascinating episode. Jason Scott works for the Internet Archive, personally hosts a large archive of historic BBS text files, and is an engaging interviewee (plus, he talks a lot :) )

If you’re interested in how archive.org works (including how they choose disks for their storage, how content is processed and managed, whether they keep spam, how many hours of “sermons” have been stored, etc), or what happens when you get sued for USD2,000,000,000, it’s well worth a listen.

Podcast/Talk Summary – OggCamp “Main stage ‘Extravaganza'”

Format: Five podcasting guys standing in front of an audience. No slides. Discussion. 200ish attendees

Audio: https://latenightlinux.com/late-night-linux-extra-episode-05/

Slot: Slot 9 Saturday (Closing Session) 16:00-17:00

Notes: My first main stage show. Two questions proposed by the podcasters and a discussion with the audience. Slightly waffly on my part, mostly because I was tired. I also was taking the “mic around to the audience”. Skilfully mastered by Joe Ressington.

Well worth a listen – I’d like to know your views on anything raised in the podcast in the comments!

Oh, and at the end, I tried to make a point, but couldn’t remember the exact quote – here it is: “Be who you needed when you were younger” – Brad Montague

Enjoy :)

One to listen to: “And we’re in”

https://hackablepodcast.com/#/episodes/and-were-in

If you’ve ever wondered why you’re encouraged to use different passwords on every website, here’s a perfect example. In this episode from Cybersecurity Firm McAfee, a not-very-technical presenter asks a Penetration Tester (someone who is paid to breach a client’s own security to prove where it’s weaknesses are) to show how easy or hard it is to get into his accounts… In the end the tester goes after this presenter’s Dad’s account… and gets into his Amazon account and his Facebook account in only a couple of minutes.

He also explains some things you can do to keep an eye on these things for yourself. In general this is a fantastic podcast to listen to, and I’d strongly suggest you subscribe to it because it’s not too over-the-top, it’s not pitched at the techno-nerds (like me ;) ) it’s just … right.

Podcast Summary – The Admin Admin Podcast #61 – Not quite so ephemeral

January was a busy month for me – between work, helping direct developments to CCHits.net, organising OggCamp, starting Sociable Tech (more on these later), I’ve now also become a regular co-host on The Admin Admin podcast – a podcast for people who work in IT.

Originally started by Al and Andy, Jerry joined them early in the recording series, and just recently Andy has changed jobs and doesn’t have the time to record at the moment. Ever since Al and Andy approached me at OggCamp ’15, I’ve recorded shows as an occasional guest host and providing feedback on episodes where it was appropriate… so I was happy to receive the message asking if I wanted to become a regular co-host.

As I’ve joined the show, we’ve changed the format slightly, reduced our recording expectations (we’re just aiming for one show a month now) and by our good fortune, my good friend, Dave Lee from The Bugcast, has also been roped in to help with recording and producing… he did a fine job with this show!

So, expect to see more posts from me, talking about the show in here.

In this show (Episode 61) we talk about naming hosts, home labs, routers and firewalls and Jerry and I waffle on about Vagrant…. a LOT :) Oh, and we teach Al what ephemeral means.

Oh, and yes, I explain about my Streisand box in this show and get it *completely and utterly wrong*. It’s rather embarrassing. I’ll explain properly on the next show exactly what happens!!

Podcast Summary – The Ubuntu Podcast, S10E26

In two weeks I have appeared in three podcasts, and this is the third!

I was asked to participate in The Ubuntu Podcast – S10E26 – Endurable Wiry Bird because of my organisational involvement in the most recent OggCamp. I also mention a VPN product I think is useful for protecting yourself on public WiFi, and I mention my struggles with “Bash on Ubuntu for Windows” (symlinks of directories and FUSE filesystems). My wonderful and constructive wife said that I wasn’t very good at being interviewed (I kept having to be dragged back to talking to “normal people” level), but that it sounded like a professional radio show.

I really enjoy being on all these podcasts… I just wish I was a better guest on them!

Weird technical note: I have recently taken to recording the feeds from two separate microphones and submitting them both to the podcast for mixing purposes. On this occasion that back-fired… The “better” microphone picked up the other people in the audio from the “more rubbish” communications headset I use at work, that we were using to have the conference call. Fortunately, I’d recorded the audio from that too, as that had removed (or, more likely, never picked up) the audio from the other parties on the call… So next time, I need to either use better in-ear headphones for that, it just stick with the comms headset, and hope for the best!

Podcast Summary – Admin Admin Podcast #58

Less than two weeks after my last “Live” show with the podcast, I’m once again contributing to the show. This time, I’m covering for Jerry as a guest presenter on The Admin Admin Podcast – #58 The Correct Answer to the Microsoft Question? this time being a bit controversial for anyone who knows me… By defending Microsoft. I also mention using Ansible to automate server software deployments, and tried to work out how small IT firms work out when to get support contracts. I briefly mention kanban as a task tracking methodology and a specific implementation for MS Outlook.

The Admin Admin podcast is a really nice and broad ranged podcast by three guys who work in IT support at different levels of the support chain. I think, if you work in IT, it’s probably worth having a listen.

One to listen to: “Null and Void”

http://www.radiolab.org/story/null-and-void/

This podcast from Radiolab is intriguing. The first half had me hoping for the underdog, then there’s an interview with a very cross older gentleman, who’s clearly had enough of not having his voice heard…. At which point, I realise what is proposed could “burn it [American Civilisation] all down”… And suddenly I don’t want the underdog to win.

And the reason I think this is “one to listen to” is because of that guy. Basically, if you fight so passionately about something that you’re ready to hurt someone over that thing, you need to take a step back and check it’s the right thing to be fighting for. Chances are, it probably isn’t.

This podcast talks about a concept in US (and probably UK) law called “Jury Nullification”, where even if the law clearly defines some act or inaction to be prohibited, the Jury can express their distaste about that law by deciding “Not Guilty”. If that verdict comes down often enough, it “might” send a message to the law makers that there’s something wrong with that particular law, and perhaps it will be re-written.

One to listen to: “CodeNewbie Podcast Episode 116 – Diversity in Tech – Part I (Ashe Dryden)”

Today’s recommended podcast listening is from the CodeNewbie podcast, and this episode is about trying to level the playing field for any minority group looking to get into technology. It also discusses how focusing on the “next generation” of [Required Group Of People] is the wrong way to do it, and just pushes back the problem by 10+ years (until *they* get out of school and find there are no jobs for them either!)

The subject of the interview is Ashe Dryden, a woman who, among other things is a diversity consultant and organiser of AlterConf, a conference about Diversity.

As a conference organiser in tech, I’m keen to keep a close eye on how to do things better, and this interview really opened my eyes into how you *can* do better at organising conferences, and I’ll be taking as much of what I can from this interview to do my next conference better.