"inventory" by "Lee" on Flickr

Using a AWS Dynamic Inventory with Ansible 2.10

In Ansible 2.10, Ansible started bundling modules and plugins as “Collections”, basically meaning that Ansible didn’t need to make a release every time a vendor wanted to update the libraries it required, or API changes required new fields to be supplied to modules. As part of this split between “Collections” and “Core”, the AWS modules and plugins got moved into a collection.

Now, if you’re using Ansible 2.9 or earlier, this probably doesn’t impact you, but there are some nice features in Ansible 2.10 that I wanted to use, so… buckle up :)

Getting started with Ansible 2.10, using a virtual environment

If you currently are using Ansible 2.9, it’s probably worth creating a “python virtual environment”, or “virtualenv” to try out Ansible 2.10. I did this on my Ubuntu 20.04 machine by typing:

sudo apt install -y virtualenv
mkdir -p ~/bin
cd ~/bin
virtualenv -p python3 ansible_2.10

The above ensures that you have virtualenv installed, creates a directory called “bin” in your home directory, if it doesn’t already exist, and then places the virtual environment, using Python3, into a directory there called “ansible_2.10“.

Whenever we want to use this new environment you must activate it, using this command:

source ~/bin/ansible_2.10/bin/activate

Once you’ve executed this, any binary packages created in that virtual environment will be executed from there, in preference to the file system packages.

You can tell that you’ve “activated” this virtual environment, because your prompt changes from user@HOST:~$ to (ansible_2.10) user@HOST:~$ which helps 😀

Next, let’s create a requirements.txt file. This will let us install the environment in a repeatable manner (which is useful with Ansible). Here’s the content of this file.

ansible>=2.10
boto3
botocore

So, this isn’t just Ansible, it’s also the supporting libraries we’ll need to talk to AWS from Ansible.

We execute the following command:

pip install -r requirements.txt

Note, on Windows Subsystem for Linux version 1 (which I’m using) this will take a reasonable while, particularly if it’s crossing from the WSL environment into the Windows environment, depending on where you have specified the virtual environment to be placed.

If you get an error message about something to do with being unable to install ffi, then you’ll need to install the package libffi-dev with sudo apt install -y libffi-dev and then re-run the pip install command above.

Once the installation has completed, you can run ansible --version to see something like the following:

ansible 2.10.2
  config file = None
  configured module search path = ['/home/user/.ansible/plugins/modules', '/usr/share/ansible/plugins/modules']
  ansible python module location = /home/user/ansible_2.10/lib/python3.8/site-packages/ansible
  executable location = /home/user/ansible_2.10/bin/ansible
  python version = 3.8.2 (default, Jul 16 2020, 14:00:26) [GCC 9.3.0]

Configuring Ansible for local collections

Ansible relies on certain paths in the filesystem to store things like collections, roles and modules, but I like to circumvent these things – particularly if I’m developing something, or moving from one release to the next. Fortunately, Ansible makes this very easy, using a single file, ansible.cfg to tell the code that’s running in this path where to find things.

A quick note on File permissions with ansible.cfg

Note that the POSIX file permissions for the directory you’re in really matter! It must be set to 775 (-rwxrwxr-x) as a maximum – if it’s “world writable” (the last number) it won’t use this file! Other options include 770, 755. If you accidentally set this as world writable, or are using a directory from the “Windows” side of WSL, then you’ll get an error message like this:

[WARNING]: Ansible is being run in a world writable directory (/home/user/ansible_2.10_aws), ignoring it as an ansible.cfg source. For more information see
https://docs.ansible.com/ansible/devel/reference_appendices/config.html#cfg-in-world-writable-dir

That link is this one: https://docs.ansible.com/ansible/devel/reference_appendices/config.html#cfg-in-world-writable-dir and has some useful advice.

Back to configuring Ansible

In ansible.cfg, I have the following configured:

[defaults]
collections_paths = ./collections:~/.ansible/collections:/usr/share/ansible/collections

This file didn’t previously exist in this directory, so I created that file.

This block asks Ansible to check the following paths in order:

  • collections in this path (e.g. /home/user/ansible_2.10_aws/collections)
  • collections in the .ansible directory under the user’s home directory (e.g. /home/user/.ansible/collections)
  • and finally /usr/share/ansible/collections for system-wide collections.

If you don’t configure Ansible with the ansible.cfg file, the default is to store the collections in ~/.ansible/collections, but you can “only have one version of the collection”, so this means that if you’re relying on things not to change when testing, or if you’re running multiple versions of Ansible on your system, then it’s safest to store the collections in the same file tree as you’re working in!

Installing Collections

Now we have Ansible 2.10 installed, and our Ansible configuration file set up, let’s get our collection ready to install. We do this with a requirements.yml file, like this:

---
collections:
- name: amazon.aws
  version: ">=1.2.1"

What does this tell us? Firstly, that we want to install the Amazon AWS collection from Ansible Galaxy. Secondly that we want at least the most current version (which is currently version 1.2.1). If you leave the version line out, it’ll get “the latest” version. If you replace ">=1.2.1" with 1.2.1 it’ll install exactly that version from Galaxy.

If you want any other collections, you add them as subsequent lines (more details here), like this:

collections:
- name: amazon.aws
  version: ">=1.2.1"
- name: some.other
- name: git+https://example.com/someorg/somerepo.git
  version: 1.0.0
- name: git@example.com:someorg/someotherrepo.git

Once we’ve got this file, we run this command to install the content of the requirements.yml: ansible-galaxy collection install -r requirements.yml

In our case, this installs just the amazon.aws collection, which is what we want. Fab!

Getting our dynamic inventory

Right, so we’ve got all the pieces now that we need! Let’s tell Ansible that we want it to ask AWS for an inventory. There are three sections to this.

Configuring Ansible, again!

We need to open up our ansible.cfg file. Because we’re using the collection to get our Dynamic Inventory plugin, we need to tell Ansible to use that plugin. Edit ./ansible.cfg in your favourite editor, and add this block to the end:

[inventory]
enable_plugins = aws_ec2

If you previously created the ansible.cfg file when you were setting up to get the collection installed alongside, then your ansible.cfg file will look (something) like this:

[defaults]
collections_paths     = ./collections:~/.ansible/collections:/usr/share/ansible/collections

[inventory]
enable_plugins = amazon.aws.aws_ec2

Configure AWS

Your machine needs to have access tokens to interact with the AWS API. These are stored in ~/.aws/credentials (e.g. /home/user/.aws/credentials) and look a bit like this:

[default]
aws_access_key_id = A1B2C3D4E5F6G7H8I9J0
aws_secret_access_key = A1B2C3D4E5F6G7H8I9J0a1b2c3d4e5f6g7h8i9j0

Set up your inventory

In a bit of a change to how Ansible usually does the inventory, to have a plugin based dynamic inventory, you can’t specify a file any more, you have to specify a directory. So, create the file ./inventory/aws_ec2.yaml (having created the directory inventory first). The file contains the following:

---
plugin: amazon.aws.aws_ec2

Late edit 2020-12-01: Further to the comment by Giovanni, I’ve amended this file snippet from plugin: aws_ec2 to plugin: amazon.aws.aws_ec2.

By default, this just retrieves the hostnames of any running EC2 instance, as you can see by running ansible-inventory -i inventory --graph

@all:
  |--@aws_ec2:
  |  |--ec2-176-34-76-187.eu-west-1.compute.amazonaws.com
  |  |--ec2-54-170-131-24.eu-west-1.compute.amazonaws.com
  |  |--ec2-54-216-87-131.eu-west-1.compute.amazonaws.com
  |--@ungrouped:

I need a bit more detail than this – I like to use the tags I assign to AWS assets to decide what I’m going to target the machines with. I also know exactly which regions I’ve got my assets in, and what I want to use to get the names of the devices, so this is what I’ve put in my aws_ec2.yaml file:

---
plugin: amazon.aws.aws_ec2
keyed_groups:
- key: tags
  prefix: tag
- key: 'security_groups|json_query("[].group_name")'
  prefix: security_group
- key: placement.region
  prefix: aws_region
- key: tags.Role
  prefix: role
regions:
- eu-west-1
hostnames:
- tag:Name
- dns-name
- public-ip-address
- private-ip-address

Late edit 2020-12-01: Again, I’ve amended this file snippet from plugin: aws_ec2 to plugin: amazon.aws.aws_ec2.

Now, when I run ansible-inventory -i inventory --graph, I get this output:

@all:
  |--@aws_ec2:
  |  |--euwest1-firewall
  |  |--euwest1-demo
  |  |--euwest1-manager
  |--@aws_region_eu_west_1:
  |  |--euwest1-firewall
  |  |--euwest1-demo
  |  |--euwest1-manager
  |--@role_Firewall:
  |  |--euwest1-firewall
  |--@role_Firewall_Manager:
  |  |--euwest1-manager
  |--@role_VM:
  |  |--euwest1-demo
  |--@security_group_euwest1_allow_all:
  |  |--euwest1-firewall
  |  |--euwest1-demo
  |  |--euwest1-manager
  |--@tag_Name_euwest1_firewall:
  |  |--euwest1-firewall
  |--@tag_Name_euwest1_demo:
  |  |--euwest1-demo
  |--@tag_Name_euwest1_manager:
  |  |--euwest1-manager
  |--@tag_Role_Firewall:
  |  |--euwest1-firewall
  |--@tag_Role_Firewall_Manager:
  |  |--euwest1-manager
  |--@tag_Role_VM:
  |  |--euwest1-demo
  |--@ungrouped:

To finish

Now you have your dynamic inventory, you can target your playbook at any of the groups listed above (like role_Firewall, aws_ec2, aws_region_eu_west_1 or some other tag) like you would any other inventory assignment, like this:

---
- hosts: role_Firewall
  gather_facts: false
  tasks:
  - name: Show the name of this device
    debug:
      msg: "{{ inventory_hostname }}"

And there you have it. Hope this is useful!

Late edit: 2020-11-23: Following a conversation with Andy from Work, we’ve noticed that if you’re trying to do SSM connections, rather than username/password based ones, you might want to put this in your aws_ec2.yml file:

---
plugin: amazon.aws.aws_ec2
hostnames:
  - tag:Name
compose:
  ansible_host: instance_id
  ansible_connection: 'community.aws.aws_ssm'

Late edit 2020-12-01: One final instance, I’ve changed plugin: aws_ec2 to plugin: amazon.aws.aws_ec2.

This will keep your hostnames “pretty” (with whatever you’ve tagged it as), but will let you connect over SSM to the Instance ID. Good fun :)

Featured image is “inventory” by “Lee” on Flickr and is released under a CC-BY-SA license.

"Accept a New SSH Host Key" by "Linux Screenshots" on Flickr

Purposefully Reducing SSH Security when performing Builds of short-lived devices

I’ve recently been developing a few builds of things at home using throw-away sessions of virtual machines, and I found myself repeatedly having to accept and even having to remove SSH host keys for things I knew wouldn’t be around for long. It’s not a huge disaster, but it’s an annoyance.

This annoyance comes from the fact that SSH uses a thing called “Trust-On-First-Use” (Or TOFU) to protect yourself against a “Man-in-the-Middle” attack (or even where the host has been replaced with something malicious), which, for infrastructure that has a long lifetime (anything more than a couple of days) makes sense! You’re building something you want to trust hasn’t been compromised! That said, if you’re building new virtual machines, testing something and then rebuilding it to prove your script worked… well, that’s not so useful!

So, in this case, if you’ve got a designated build network, or if you trust, implicitly, your normal working network, this is a dead simple work-around.

In $HOME/.ssh/config or in $HOME/.ssh/config.d/local (if you’ve followed my previous advice to use separate ssh config files), add the following stanza:

# RFC1918
Host 10.* 172.16.* 172.17.* 172.18.* 172.19.* 172.20.* 172.21.* 172.22.* 172.23.* 172.24.* 172.25.* 172.26.* 172.27.* 172.28.* 172.29.* 172.30.* 172.31.* 192.168.*
        StrictHostKeyChecking no
        UserKnownHostsFile /dev/null

# RFC5373 and RFC2544
Host 192.0.2.* 198.51.100.* 203.0.113.* 198.18.* 198.19.*
        StrictHostKeyChecking no
        UserKnownHostsFile /dev/null

These stanzas let you disable host key checking for any IP address in the RFC1918 ranges (10.0.0.0/8, 172.16.0.0/12 and 192.168.0.0/16), and for the RFC5373 ranges (192.0.2.0/24, 198.51.100.0/24 and 203.0.113.0/24) – which should be used for documentation, and for the RFC2544 range (198.18.0.0/15) which should be used for inter-network testing.

Alternatively, if you always use a DDNS provider for short-lived assignments (for example, I use davd/docker-ddns) then instead, you can use this stanza:

Host *.ddns.example.com
        StrictHostKeyChecking no
        UserKnownHostsFile /dev/null

(Assuming, of course, you use ddns.example.com as your DDNS address!)

Featured image is “Accept a New SSH Host Key” by “Linux Screenshots” on Flickr and is released under a CC-BY license.

“New shoes” by “Morgaine” from Flickr

Making Windows Cloud-Init Scripts run after a reboot (Using Terraform)

I’m currently building a Proof Of Value (POV) environment for a product, and one of the things I needed in my environment was an Active Directory domain.

To do this in AWS, I had to do the following steps:

  1. Build my Domain Controller
    1. Install Windows
    2. Set the hostname (Reboot)
    3. Promote the machine to being a Domain Controller (Reboot)
    4. Create a domain user
  2. Build my Member Server
    1. Install Windows
    2. Set the hostname (Reboot)
    3. Set the DNS client to point to the Domain Controller
    4. Join the server to the domain (Reboot)

To make this work, I had to find a way to trigger build steps after each reboot. I was working with Windows 2012R2, Windows 2016 and Windows 2019, so the solution had to be cross-version. Fortunately I found this script online! That version was great for Windows 2012R2, but didn’t cover Windows 2016 or later… So let’s break down what I’ve done!

In your userdata field, you need to have two sets of XML strings, as follows:

<persist>true</persist>
<powershell>
$some = "powershell code"
</powershell>

The first block says to Windows 2016+ “keep trying to run this script on each boot” (note that you need to stop it from doing non-relevant stuff on each boot – we’ll get to that in a second!), and the second bit is the PowerShell commands you want it to run. The rest of this now will focus just on the PowerShell block.

  $path= 'HKLM:\Software\UserData'
  
  if(!(Get-Item $Path -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue)) {
    New-Item $Path
    New-ItemProperty -Path $Path -Name RunCount -Value 0 -PropertyType dword
  }
  
  $runCount = Get-ItemProperty -Path $path -Name Runcount -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue | Select-Object -ExpandProperty RunCount
  
  if($runCount -ge 0) {
    switch($runCount) {
      0 {
        $runCount = 1 + [int]$runCount
        Set-ItemProperty -Path $Path -Name RunCount -Value $runCount
        if ($ver -match 2012) {
          #Enable user data
          $EC2SettingsFile = "$env:ProgramFiles\Amazon\Ec2ConfigService\Settings\Config.xml"
          $xml = [xml](Get-Content $EC2SettingsFile)
          $xmlElement = $xml.get_DocumentElement()
          $xmlElementToModify = $xmlElement.Plugins
          
          foreach ($element in $xmlElementToModify.Plugin)
          {
            if ($element.name -eq "Ec2HandleUserData") {
              $element.State="Enabled"
            }
          }
          $xml.Save($EC2SettingsFile)
        }
        $some = "PowerShell Script"
      }
    }
  }

Whew, what a block! Well, again, we can split this up into a couple of bits.

In the first few lines, we build a pointer, a note which says “We got up to here on our previous boots”. We then read that into a variable and find that number and execute any steps in the block with that number. That’s this block:

  $path= 'HKLM:\Software\UserData'
  
  if(!(Get-Item $Path -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue)) {
    New-Item $Path
    New-ItemProperty -Path $Path -Name RunCount -Value 0 -PropertyType dword
  }
  
  $runCount = Get-ItemProperty -Path $path -Name Runcount -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue | Select-Object -ExpandProperty RunCount
  
  if($runCount -ge 0) {
    switch($runCount) {

    }
  }

The next part (and you’ll repeat it for each “number” of reboot steps you need to perform) says “increment the number” then “If this is Windows 2012, remind the userdata handler that the script needs to be run again next boot”. That’s this block:

      0 {
        $runCount = 1 + [int]$runCount
        Set-ItemProperty -Path $Path -Name RunCount -Value $runCount
        if ($ver -match 2012) {
          #Enable user data
          $EC2SettingsFile = "$env:ProgramFiles\Amazon\Ec2ConfigService\Settings\Config.xml"
          $xml = [xml](Get-Content $EC2SettingsFile)
          $xmlElement = $xml.get_DocumentElement()
          $xmlElementToModify = $xmlElement.Plugins
          
          foreach ($element in $xmlElementToModify.Plugin)
          {
            if ($element.name -eq "Ec2HandleUserData") {
              $element.State="Enabled"
            }
          }
          $xml.Save($EC2SettingsFile)
        }
        
      }

In fact, it’s fair to say that in my userdata script, this looks like this:

  $path= 'HKLM:\Software\UserData'
  
  if(!(Get-Item $Path -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue)) {
    New-Item $Path
    New-ItemProperty -Path $Path -Name RunCount -Value 0 -PropertyType dword
  }
  
  $runCount = Get-ItemProperty -Path $path -Name Runcount -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue | Select-Object -ExpandProperty RunCount
  
  if($runCount -ge 0) {
    switch($runCount) {
      0 {
        ${file("templates/step.tmpl")}

        ${templatefile(
          "templates/rename_windows.tmpl",
          {
            hostname = "SomeMachine"
          }
        )}
      }
      1 {
        ${file("templates/step.tmpl")}

        ${templatefile(
          "templates/join_ad.tmpl",
          {
            dns_ipv4 = "192.0.2.1",
            domain_suffix = "ad.mycorp",
            join_account = "ad\someuser",
            join_password = "SomePassw0rd!"
          }
        )}
      }
    }
  }

Then, after each reboot, you need a new block. I have a block to change the computer name, a block to join the machine to the domain, and a block to install an software that I need.

Featured image is “New shoes” by “Morgaine” on Flickr and is released under a CC-BY-SA license.

"Debian" by "medithIT" on Flickr

One to read: Installing #Debian on #QNAP TS-219P

A couple of years ago, a very lovely co-worked gave me his QNAP TS-219P which he no longer required. I’ve had it sitting around storing data, but not making the most use of it since he gave it to me.

After a bit of tinkering in my home network, I decided that I needed a more up-to-date OS on this device, so I found this page that tells you how to install Debian Buster. This will wipe the device, so make sure you’ve got a full backup of your content!

https://www.cyrius.com/debian/kirkwood/qnap/ts-219/install/

Essentially, you backup the existing firmware with these commands:

cat /dev/mtdblock0 > mtd0
cat /dev/mtdblock1 > mtd1
cat /dev/mtdblock2 > mtd2
cat /dev/mtdblock3 > mtd3
cat /dev/mtdblock4 > mtd4
cat /dev/mtdblock5 > mtd5

These files need to be transferred off, in “case of emergency”, then download the installation files:

mkdir /tmp/debian
cd /tmp/debian
busybox wget http://ftp.debian.org/debian/dists/buster/main/installer-armel/current/images/kirkwood/network-console/qnap/ts-21x/{initrd,kernel-6281,kernel-6282,flash-debian,model}
sh flash-debian
reboot

The flash-debian command takes around 3-5 minutes, apparently, although I did start the job and walk away, so it might have taken anywhere up to 30 minutes!

Then, SSH to the IP of the device, and use the credentials installer and install as username and password.

Complete the installation steps in the SSH session, then let it reboot.

Be aware that the device is likely to have at least one swap volume it will try to load, so it might be worth opening a shell and running the command “swapoff -a” before removing the swap partitions. It’s also worth removing all the partitions and then rebooting and starting again if you have any problems with the partitioning.

When it comes back, you have a base installation of Debian, which doesn’t have sudo installed, so use su - and put in the root password.

Good luck!

"Unnatural Love" by "Keith Garner" on Flickr

Configuring a Remote Desktop (Gnome Shell) for Ubuntu

I started thinking a couple of weeks ago, when my coding laptop broke, that it would be really useful to have a development machine somewhere else that I could use.

It wouldn’t need a lot of power (after all, I’m mostly developing web apps and not compiling stuff), but it does need to be a desktop OS, as I rather like being able to open code editors and suchlike, while I’ve got a web browser open.

I have an Android tablet, which while it’s great for being a tablet, it’s not much use as a desktop, and … yes, I’ve got a work laptop, but I don’t really want to install software on that (and I don’t think my admin team would be happy if I did).

Also, I quite like Linux.

Some time ago, I spotted that AWS has a “Virtual Desktop” environment, and I think that’s kinda what I’m after. Something I can spin up, run for a bit and then shut it down, so I thought I’d build something like that… but not pesky Windows, after all… who likes Windows, eh? ;)

So, I built a Virtual Desktop Environment (VDE) in AWS, using Terraform and a bit of shell script!

I start from an Ubuntu 18.04 server image, and, after the install is complete, I run this user-data script inside it. Yes, I know I could be doing this with Ansible, but… eh, I wanted it to be a quick deployment ;)

Oh, and there’s a couple of Terraform managed variables in here – ${aws_eip.vde.public_ip} is the AWS public IP address assigned to this host., ${var.firstuser} is the username we want to rename “ubuntu” (the stock server username) to. ${var.firstgecos} is the user’s “real name” which the machine identifies the user as (like “Log out Jon Spriggs” and so on). ${var.userpw} is either the password you want it to use, OR (by default) pwgen 12 which generates a 12 character long password. ${var.desktopenv} is the name of the desktop environment I want to install (Ubuntu by default) and … well, ${var.var_start} is a bit of a fudge, because I couldn’t, in a hurry, work out how to tell Terraform not to mangle the bash variable allocation of ${somevar} which is the format that Terraform also uses. D’oh.

#! /bin/bash
#################
# Set Hostname
#################
hostnamectl set-hostname vde.${aws_eip.vde.public_ip}.nip.io
#################
# Change User
#################
user=${var.firstuser}
if [ ! "$user" == 'ubuntu' ]
then
  until usermod -c "${var.firstgecos}" -l $user ubuntu ; do sleep 5 ; done
  until groupmod -n $user ubuntu ; do sleep 5 ; done
  until usermod  -d /home/$user -m $user ; do sleep 5 ; done
  if [ -f /etc/sudoers.d/90-cloudimg-ubuntu ]; then
    mv /etc/sudoers.d/90-cloudimg-ubuntu /etc/sudoers.d/90-cloud-init-users
  fi
  perl -pi -e "s/ubuntu/$user/g;" /etc/sudoers.d/90-cloud-init-users
fi
if [ '${var.userpw}' == '$(pwgen 12)' ]
then 
  apt update && apt install pwgen
fi
newpw="${var.userpw}"
echo "$newpw" > /var/log/userpw
fullpw="$newpw"
fullpw+="\n"
fullpw+="$newpw"
echo -e "$fullpw" | passwd $user
##########################
# Install Desktop and RDP
##########################
apt-get update
export DEBIAN_FRONTEND=noninteractive
apt-get full-upgrade -yq
apt-get autoremove -y
apt-get autoclean -y
apt-get install -y ${var.desktopenv}-desktop xrdp certbot
##########################
# Configure Certbot
##########################
echo "#!/bin/sh" > /etc/letsencrypt/merge_cert.sh
echo 'cat ${var.var_start}{RENEWED_LINEAGE}/privkey.pem ${var.var_start}{RENEWED_LINEAGE}/fullchain.pem > ${var.var_start}{RENEWED_LINEAGE}/merged.pem' >> /etc/letsencrypt/merge_cert.sh
echo 'chmod 640 ${var.var_start}{RENEWED_LINEAGE}/merged.pem' >> /etc/letsencrypt/merge_cert.sh
chmod 750 /etc/letsencrypt/merge_cert.sh
certbot certonly --standalone --deploy-hook /etc/letsencrypt/merge_cert.sh -n -d vde.${aws_eip.vde.public_ip}.nip.io -d ${aws_eip.vde.public_ip}.nip.io --register-unsafely-without-email --agree-tos
# Based on https://www.snel.com/support/xrdp-with-lets-encrypt-on-ubuntu-18-04/
sed -i 's~^certificate=$~certificate=/etc/letsencrypt/live/vde.${aws_eip.vde.public_ip}.nip.io/fullchain.pem~; s~^key_file=$~key_file=/etc/letsencrypt/live/vde.${aws_eip.vde.public_ip}.nip.io/privkey.pem' /etc/xrdp/xrdp.ini
##############################
# Fix colord remote user issue
##############################
# Derived from http://c-nergy.be/blog/?p=12043
echo "[Allow Colord all Users]
Identity=unix-user:*
Action=org.freedesktop.color-manager.create-device;org.freedesktop.color-manager.create-profile;org.freedesktop.color-manager.delete-device;org.freedesktop.color-manager.delete-profile;org.freedesktop.color-manager.modify-device;org.freedesktop.color-manager.modify-profile
ResultAny=no
ResultInactive=no
ResultActive=yes" > /etc/polkit-1/localauthority/50-local.d/45-allow.colord.pkla
##############################
# Configure Desktop
##############################
if [ '${var.desktopenv}' == 'ubuntu' ]
then 
  echo "#!/bin/bash" > /tmp/desktop_settings
  echo "gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.input-sources sources \"[('xkb', 'gb')]\"" >> /tmp/desktop_settings
  echo "gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.app-folders folder-children \"['Utilities', 'Sundry', 'YaST']\"" >> /tmp/desktop_settings
  echo "gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.privacy report-technical-problems false" >> /tmp/desktop_settings
  echo "gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.screensaver lock-enabled false" >> /tmp/desktop_settings
  echo "gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.session idle-delay 0" >> /tmp/desktop_settings
  echo "echo yes > /home/${var.firstuser}/.config/gnome-initial-setup-done" >> /tmp/desktop_settings
  sudo -H -u ${var.firstuser} dbus-launch --exit-with-session bash /tmp/desktop_settings
  rm -f /tmp/desktop_settings
fi
##########################
# Install VSCode
##########################
wget https://vscode-update.azurewebsites.net/latest/linux-deb-x64/stable -O /tmp/vscode.deb
apt install -y /tmp/vscode.deb
rm /var/crash/*
shutdown -r now

Ubuntu 18.04 has a “first login” wizard, that lets you pre-set up things like, what language will you be using. I bypassed this with the gsettings commands towards the end of the script, and writing the string “yes” to ~/.config/gnome-initial-setup-done.

Also, I wanted to be able to RDP to it. I’m a bit concerned by the use of VNC, especially where RDP is more than capable. It’s just an apt-install away, so… that’s what I do. But, because I’m RDP’ing into this box, I wanted to prevent the RDP session from locking, so I provide two commands to the session: gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.screensaver lock-enabled false which removes the screensaver’s ability to lock the screen, and gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.session idle-delay 0 which stops the screensaver from even starting in the first place.

Now all I need to do is to figure out where I’m going to store my code between boots ;)

So, in summary, I now have a Virtual Machine, which runs Ubuntu 18.04 Desktop, in AWS, with an RDP connection (powered by xRDP), and a disabled screensaver. Job done, I think!

Oh, and if I’m doing it “wrong”, let me know in the comments? :)

Featured image is “Unnatural Love” by “Keith Garner” on Flickr and is released under a CC-BY-SA license.

Podcast Summary – “TechSNAP Episode 384: Interplanetary Peers”

Last night I was a guest host on TechSNAP, a systems, network and administration podcast.

The episode I recorded was: TechSNAP Episode 384: Interplanetary Peers

In this episode, I helped cover the news items, mostly talking about the breach over at NewEgg by the MagePay group and a (now fixed) vulnerability in Alpine Linux, and then did a bit of a dive into IPFS.

It’s a good listen, but the audio right at the end was quite noisy as a storm settled in just as I was recording my outro.

“You can’t run multiple commands in sudo” – and how to work around this

At work, we share tips and tricks, and one of my colleagues recently called me out on the following stanza I posted:

I like this [ansible] one for Debian based systems:
  - name: "Apt update, Full-upgrade, autoremove, autoclean"
    become: yes
    apt:
      upgrade: full
      update_cache: yes
      autoremove: yes
      autoclean: yes

And if you’re trying to figure out how to do that in Shell:
apt-get update && apt-get full-update -y && apt-get autoremove -y && apt-get autoclean -y

His response was “Surely you’re not logging into bash as root”. I said “I normally sudo -i as soon as I’ve logged in. I can’t recall offhand how one does a sudo for a string of command && command statements”

Well, as a result of this, I looked into it. Here’s one comment from the first Stack Overflow page I found:

You can’t run multiple commands from sudo – you always need to trick it into executing a shell which may accept multiple commands to run as parameters

So here are a few options on how to do that:

  1. sudo -s whoami \; whoami (link to answer)
  2. sudo sh -c "whoami ; whoami" (link to answer)
  3. But, my favourite is from this answer:

    An alternative using eval so avoiding use of a subshell: sudo -s eval 'whoami; whoami'

Why do I prefer the last one? Well, I already use eval for other purposes – mostly for starting my ssh-agent over SSH, like this: eval `ssh-agent` ; ssh-add

One to read/watch: IPsec and IKE Tutorial

Ever been told that IPsec is hard? Maybe you’ve seen it yourself? Well, Paul Wouters and Sowmini Varadhan recently co-delivered a talk at the NetDev conference, and it’s really good.

Sowmini’s and Paul’s slides are available here: https://www.files.netdevconf.org/d/a18e61e734714da59571/

A complete recording of the tutorial is here. Sowmini’s part of the tutorial (which starts first in the video) is quite technically complex, looking at specifically the way that Linux handles the packets through the kernel. I’ve focused more on Paul’s part of the tutorial (starting at 26m23s)… but my interest was piqued from 40m40s when he starts to actually show how “easy” configuration is. There are two quick run throughs of typical host-to-host IPsec and subnet-to-subnet IPsec tunnels.

A key message for me, which previously hadn’t been at all clear in IPsec using {free,libre,open}swan is that they refer to Left and Right as being one party and the other… but the node itself works out if it’s “left” or “right” so the *SAME CONFIG* can be used on both machines. GENIUS.

Also, when you’re looking at the config files, anything prefixed with an @ symbol is something that doesn’t need resolving to something else.

It’s well worth a check-out, and it’s inspired me to take another look at IPsec for my personal VPNs :)

I should note that towards the end, Paul tried to run a selection of demonstrations in Opportunistic Encryption (which basically is a way to enable encryption between two nodes, even if you don’t have a pre-established VPN with them). Because of issues with the conference wifi, plus the fact that what he’s demoing isn’t exactly production-grade yet, it doesn’t really work right, and much of the rest of the video (from around 1h10m) is him trying to show that working while attendees are running through the lab, and having conversations about those labs with the attendees.