"#security #lockpick" by "John Jones" on Flickr

Auto-starting an SSH Agent in Windows Subsystem for Linux

I tend to use Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) as a comprehensive SSH client, mostly for running things like Ansible scripts and Terraform. One of the issues I’ve had with it though is that, on a Linux GUI based system, I would start my SSH Agent on login, and then the first time I used an SSH key, I would unlock the key using the agent, and it would be cached for the duration of my logged in session.

While I was looking for something last night, I came across this solution on Stack Overflow (which in turn links to this blog post, which in turn links to this mailing list post) that suggests adding the following stanza to ~/.profile in WSL. I’m running the WSL version of Ubuntu 20.04, but the same principles apply on Cygwin, or, probably, any headless-server installation of a Linux distribution, if that’s your thing.

SSH_ENV="$HOME/.ssh/agent-environment"
function start_agent {
    echo "Initialising new SSH agent..."
    /usr/bin/ssh-agent | sed 's/^echo/#echo/' > "${SSH_ENV}"
    echo succeeded
    chmod 600 "${SSH_ENV}"
    . "${SSH_ENV}" > /dev/null
}
# Source SSH settings, if applicable
if [ -f "${SSH_ENV}" ]; then
    . "${SSH_ENV}" > /dev/null
    ps -ef | grep ${SSH_AGENT_PID} | grep ssh-agent$ > /dev/null || {
        start_agent;
    }
else
    start_agent;
fi

Now, this part is all well-and-good, but what about that part where you want to SSH using a key, and then that being unlocked for the duration of your SSH Agent being available?

To get around that, in the same solution page, there is a suggestion of adding this line to your .ssh/config: AddKeysToAgent yes. I’ve previously suggested using dynamically included SSH configuration files, so in this case, I’d look for your file which contains your “wildcard” stanza (if you have one), and add the line there. This is what mine looks like:

Host *
  AddKeysToAgent yes
  IdentityFile ~/.ssh/MyCurrentKey

How does this help you? Well, if you’re using jump hosts (using ProxyJump MyBastionHost, for example) you’ll only be prompted for your SSH Key once, or if you typically do a lot of SSH sessions, you’ll only need to unlock your session once.

BUT, and I can’t really stress this enough, don’t use this on a shared or suspected compromised system! If you’ve got a root account which can access the content of your Agent’s Socket and PID, then any protections that private key may have held for your system is compromised.

Featured image is “#security #lockpick” by “John Jones” on Flickr and is released under a CC-BY-ND license.

"$bash" by "Andrew Mager" on Flickr

One to read: Put your bash code in functions

I’ve got a few mildly ropey bash scripts which I could do with making a bit more resilient, and perhaps even operating faster ;)

As such, I found this page really interesting: https://ricardoanderegg.com/posts/bash_wrap_functions/

In it, Ricardo introduces me to two things which are interesting.

  1. Using the wait command literally waits for all the backgrounded tasks to finish.
  2. Running bash commands like this: function1 & function2 & function3 should run all three processes in parallel. To be honest, I’d always usually do it like this:
    function1 &
    function2 &
    function3 &

The other thing which Ricardo links to is a page suggesting that if you’re downloading a bash script and executing it (which, you know, probably isn’t a good idea at the best of times), then wrapping it in a function, like this:

#!/bin/bash

function main() {
  echo "Some function"
}

main

This means that the bash scripting engine needs to download and parse all the functions before it can run the script. As a result, you’re less likely to get a broken run of your script, because imagine it only got as far as:

#!/bin/bash
echo "Some fun

Then it wouldn’t have terminated the echo command (as an example)…

Anyway, some great tricks here! Love it!

Featured image is “$bash” by “Andrew Mager” on Flickr and is released under a CC-BY-SA license.

"Accept a New SSH Host Key" by "Linux Screenshots" on Flickr

Purposefully Reducing SSH Security when performing Builds of short-lived devices

I’ve recently been developing a few builds of things at home using throw-away sessions of virtual machines, and I found myself repeatedly having to accept and even having to remove SSH host keys for things I knew wouldn’t be around for long. It’s not a huge disaster, but it’s an annoyance.

This annoyance comes from the fact that SSH uses a thing called “Trust-On-First-Use” (Or TOFU) to protect yourself against a “Man-in-the-Middle” attack (or even where the host has been replaced with something malicious), which, for infrastructure that has a long lifetime (anything more than a couple of days) makes sense! You’re building something you want to trust hasn’t been compromised! That said, if you’re building new virtual machines, testing something and then rebuilding it to prove your script worked… well, that’s not so useful!

So, in this case, if you’ve got a designated build network, or if you trust, implicitly, your normal working network, this is a dead simple work-around.

In $HOME/.ssh/config or in $HOME/.ssh/config.d/local (if you’ve followed my previous advice to use separate ssh config files), add the following stanza:

# RFC1918
Host 10.* 172.16.* 172.17.* 172.18.* 172.19.* 172.20.* 172.21.* 172.22.* 172.23.* 172.24.* 172.25.* 172.26.* 172.27.* 172.28.* 172.29.* 172.30.* 172.31.* 192.168.*
        StrictHostKeyChecking no
        UserKnownHostsFile /dev/null

# RFC5373 and RFC2544
Host 192.0.2.* 198.51.100.* 203.0.113.* 198.18.* 198.19.*
        StrictHostKeyChecking no
        UserKnownHostsFile /dev/null

These stanzas let you disable host key checking for any IP address in the RFC1918 ranges (10.0.0.0/8, 172.16.0.0/12 and 192.168.0.0/16), and for the RFC5373 ranges (192.0.2.0/24, 198.51.100.0/24 and 203.0.113.0/24) – which should be used for documentation, and for the RFC2544 range (198.18.0.0/15) which should be used for inter-network testing.

Alternatively, if you always use a DDNS provider for short-lived assignments (for example, I use davd/docker-ddns) then instead, you can use this stanza:

Host *.ddns.example.com
        StrictHostKeyChecking no
        UserKnownHostsFile /dev/null

(Assuming, of course, you use ddns.example.com as your DDNS address!)

Featured image is “Accept a New SSH Host Key” by “Linux Screenshots” on Flickr and is released under a CC-BY license.

"Monitors" by "Jaysin Trevino" on Flickr

Using monit to monitor Docker Containers

As I only run a few machines with services that matter on them (notably, my home server and my web server), I don’t need a full-on monitoring service, so instead rely on a system called monit.

Monit is an open source piece of software, used to monitor (see, it’s easily named 😄) and, if possible remediate issues with things it sees wrong.

I use this for watching whether particular services are running (and if not, restart them), for whether the ink in my printer is empty, and to monitor the free space and SMART status on my disks.

Today I noticed that a Docker container had stopped, and I’d not noticed. It wasn’t a big thing, but it gnawed at me, so I had a bit of a look around to see what I can find about this.

I found this blog post, titled “Monitoring Docker Containers with Monit”, from 2014, which suggested monitoring the result from docker top… and would you believe it, that’s a valid trick 🙂

So, here’s what I’m doing! Each container has it’s own file called/etc/monit/scripts/check_container_<container-name>.sh which has just this command in it:

#! /bin/bash
docker top "<container-name>"
exit $?

Note that you replace <container-name> in both the filename and the script itself with the name of the container – for example, the container hello-world would be monitored with the file check_container_hello-world.sh, and the line in that file would say docker top "hello-world".

I then have a file in /etc/monit/conf.d/ called check_container_<container-name> which has this content

CHECK PROGRAM <container-name> WITH PATH /etc/monit/scripts/check_container_<container-name>.sh
  START PROGRAM = "/usr/bin/docker start <container-name>"
  STOP PROGRAM = "/usr/bin/docker stop <container-name>"
  IF status != 0 FOR 3 CYCLES THEN RESTART
  IF 2 RESTARTS WITHIN 5 CYCLES THEN UNMONITOR

I then ensure that in /etc/monit/monitrc the line “include /etc/monit/conf.d/*” is included and not commented out, and then restart monit with systemctl restart monit.

Featured image is “Monitors” by “Jaysin Trevino” on Flickr and is released under a CC-BY license.

"Fishing line and bobbin stuck on tree at Douthat State Park" by "Virginia State Parks" on Flickr

Note to self: Linux shell scripts don’t cope well with combined CRLF + LF files… Especially in User-Data / Custom Data / Cloud-Init scripts

This one is more a nudge to myself. On several occasions when building Infrastructure As Code (IAC), I split out a code sections into one or more files, for readability and reusability purposes. What I tended to do, and this was more apparent with the Linux builds than the Windows builds, was to forget to set the line terminator from CRLF to LF.

While this doesn’t really impact Windows builds too much (they’re kinda designed to support people being idiots with line endings now), Linux still really struggles with CRLF endings, and you’ll only see when you’ve broken this because you’ll completely fail to run any of the user-data script.

How do you determine this is your problem? Well, actually it’s a bit tricky, as neither cat, less, more or nano spot this issue. The only two things I found that identified it were file and vi.

The first part of the combined file with mixed line endings. This part has LF termination.
The second part of the combined file with mixed line endings. This part has CRLF termination.
What happens when we cat these two parts into one file? A file with CRLF, LF line terminators obviously!
What the combined file looks like in Vi. Note the blue ^M at the ends of the lines.

So, how to fix this? Assuming you’re using Visual Studio Code;

A failed line-ending clue in Visual Studio Code

You’ll notice this line showing “CRLF” in the status bar at the bottom of Code. Click on that, which brings up a discrete box near the top, as follows:

Oh no, it’s set to “CRLF”. That’s not what we want!

Selecting LF in that box changes the line feeds into LF for this file, but it’s not saved. Make sure you save this file before you re-run your terraform script!

Notice, we’re now using LF endings, but the file isn’t saved.

Fantastic! It’s all worked!

In Nano, I’ve opened the part with the invalid line endings.

Oh no! We have a “DOS Format” file. Quick, let’s fix it!

To fix this, we need to write the file out. Hit Ctrl+O. This tells us that we’re in DOS Format, and also gives us the keyboard combination to toggle “DOS Format” off – it’s Alt+D (In Unix/Linux world, the Alt key is referred to as the Meta key – hence M not A).

This is how we fix things

So, after hitting Alt+D, the “File Name to write” line changes, see below:

Yey, no pesky “DOS Format” warning here!

Using either editor (or any others, if you know how to solve line ending issues in other editors), you still need to combine your script back together before you can run it, so… do that, and your file will be fine to run! Good luck!

Featured image is “Fishing line and bobbin stuck on tree at Douthat State Park” by “Virginia State Parks” on Flickr and is released under a CC-BY license.

"Debian" by "medithIT" on Flickr

One to read: Installing #Debian on #QNAP TS-219P

A couple of years ago, a very lovely co-worked gave me his QNAP TS-219P which he no longer required. I’ve had it sitting around storing data, but not making the most use of it since he gave it to me.

After a bit of tinkering in my home network, I decided that I needed a more up-to-date OS on this device, so I found this page that tells you how to install Debian Buster. This will wipe the device, so make sure you’ve got a full backup of your content!

https://www.cyrius.com/debian/kirkwood/qnap/ts-219/install/

Essentially, you backup the existing firmware with these commands:

cat /dev/mtdblock0 > mtd0
cat /dev/mtdblock1 > mtd1
cat /dev/mtdblock2 > mtd2
cat /dev/mtdblock3 > mtd3
cat /dev/mtdblock4 > mtd4
cat /dev/mtdblock5 > mtd5

These files need to be transferred off, in “case of emergency”, then download the installation files:

mkdir /tmp/debian
cd /tmp/debian
busybox wget http://ftp.debian.org/debian/dists/buster/main/installer-armel/current/images/kirkwood/network-console/qnap/ts-21x/{initrd,kernel-6281,kernel-6282,flash-debian,model}
sh flash-debian
reboot

The flash-debian command takes around 3-5 minutes, apparently, although I did start the job and walk away, so it might have taken anywhere up to 30 minutes!

Then, SSH to the IP of the device, and use the credentials installer and install as username and password.

Complete the installation steps in the SSH session, then let it reboot.

Be aware that the device is likely to have at least one swap volume it will try to load, so it might be worth opening a shell and running the command “swapoff -a” before removing the swap partitions. It’s also worth removing all the partitions and then rebooting and starting again if you have any problems with the partitioning.

When it comes back, you have a base installation of Debian, which doesn’t have sudo installed, so use su - and put in the root password.

Good luck!

Opening to my video: Screencast 002 - A quick walk through Git

Screencast 002: A quick walk through Git (a mentoring style video)

I have done a follow-up Mentoring style video to support my last one. This video shows how to fix some of the issues in Git I came across in my last mentoring video!

Screencast 002: A quick walk through Git

I took some advice from a colleague who noticed that I skipped past a couple of issues with my Git setup, so I re-did them :) I hope this makes sense, and at 35 minutes, is a bit more understandable than the last 1h15 video!

Also on LBRY and Archive.org

Opening to my video: Screencast 001 - Ansible and Inspec using Vagrant

Screencast 001: Ansible and Inspec with Vagrant and Git (a mentoring style video)

If you’ve ever wondered how I use Ansible and Inspec, or wondered why some of my Vagrant files look like they do, well, I want to start recording some “mentor” style videos… You know how, if you were sitting next to someone who’s a mentor to you, and you watch how they build a solution.

The first one was released last night!

Screencast 001:Ansible and Inspec using Vagrant

I recently saw a video by Chris Hartjes on how he creates his TDD (Test driven development) based PHP projects, and I really wanted to emulate that style, but talking about the things I use.

This was my second attempt at recording a mentoring style video yesterday, the first was shown to the Admin Admin Podcast listeners group on Telegram, and then sacrificed to the demo gods (there were lots of issues in that first video) never to be seen again.

From a tooling perspective, I’m using a remote virtual machine running Ubuntu Mate 18.04 over RDP (to improve performance) with xrdp and Remmina, OBS is running locally to record the content, and I’m using Visual Studio Code, git, Vagrant and Virtualbox, as well as Ansible and Inspec.

Late edit 2020-02-29: Like videos like this, hate YouTube? It’s also on archive.org: https://archive.org/details/JonTheNiceGuyScreencast001

Late edit 2020-03-01: Popey told me about LBRY.tv when I announced this on the Admin Admin Podcast telegram channel, and so I’ve also copied the video to there: https://lbry.tv/@JonTheNiceGuy:b/Screencast001-Ansible-and-Inspec-with-Vagrant:8

Publishing a “Bio” in Secure Scuttlebutt, using ssb-server

This is one of those “oh, there it is” posts, more for myself than anyone else. Anyway, if you use SSB from a shell (perhaps you run your own SSB Pub, for example), you might want to run this style of command:

ssb-server publish --type about --about "$(ssb-server whoami | jq .id -r)" --name "Some Server" --description "I'm just some server, you know"

As long as you have --name or --description in there, you should be good to go!