Troubleshooting FortiGate API issues with the CLI?

One of my colleagues has asked me for some help with an Ansible script he’s writing to push some policy to a cloud hosted FortiGate appliance. Unfortunately, he kept getting some very weird error messages, like this one:

fatal: [localhost]: FAILED! => {"changed": false, "meta": {"build": 200, "error": -651, "http_method": "PUT", "http_status": 500, "mkey": "vip8080", "name": "vip", "path": "firewall", "revision": "36.0.0.10745196634707694665.1544442857", "serial": "CENSORED", "status": "error", "vdom": "root", "version": "v6.0.3"}, "msg": "Error in repo"}

This is using Fortinet’s own Ansible Modules, which, in turn use the fortiosapi python module.

This same colleague came across a post on the Fortinet Developer Network site (access to the site requires vendor approval), which said “this might be an internal bug, but to debug it, use the following”

fgt # diagnose debug enable

fgt # diagnose debug cli 8
Debug messages will be on for 30 minutes.

And then run your API commands. Your error message will be surfaced there… so here’s mine! (Mapped port doesn’t match extport in a vip).

0: config firewall vip
0: edit "vip8080"
0: unset src-filter
0: unset service
0: set extintf "port1"
0: set portforward enable
0: unset srcintf-filter
0: set mappedip "192.0.2.1-192.0.2.1"
0: unset extport
0: set extport 8080-8081
0: unset mappedport
0: set mappedport 8080
-651: end

Creating Self Signed certificates in Ansible

In my day job, I sometimes need to use a self-signed certificate when building a box. As I love using Ansible, I wanted to make the self-signed certificate piece something that was part of my Ansible workflow.

Here follows a bit of basic code that you could use to work through how the process of creating a self-signed certificate would work. I would strongly recommend using something more production-ready (e.g. LetsEncrypt) when you’re looking to move from “development” to “production” :)

---
- hosts: localhost
  vars:
  - dnsname: your.dns.name
  - tmppath: "./tmp/"
  - crtpath: "{{ tmppath }}{{ dnsname }}.crt"
  - pempath: "{{ tmppath }}{{ dnsname }}.pem"
  - csrpath: "{{ tmppath }}{{ dnsname }}.csr"
  - pfxpath: "{{ tmppath }}{{ dnsname }}.pfx"
  - private_key_password: "password"
  tasks:
  - file:
      path: "{{ tmppath }}"
      state: absent
  - file:
      path: "{{ tmppath }}"
      state: directory
  - name: "Generate the private key file to sign the CSR"
    openssl_privatekey:
      path: "{{ pempath }}"
      passphrase: "{{ private_key_password }}"
      cipher: aes256
  - name: "Generate the CSR file signed with the private key"
    openssl_csr:
      path: "{{ csrpath }}"
      privatekey_path: "{{ pempath }}"
      privatekey_passphrase: "{{ private_key_password }}"
      common_name: "{{ dnsname }}"
  - name: "Sign the CSR file as a CA to turn it into a certificate"
    openssl_certificate:
      path: "{{ crtpath }}"
      privatekey_path: "{{ pempath }}"
      privatekey_passphrase: "{{ private_key_password }}"
      csr_path: "{{ csrpath }}"
      provider: selfsigned
  - name: "Convert the signed certificate into a PKCS12 file with the attached private key"
    openssl_pkcs12:
      action: export
      path: "{{ pfxpath }}"
      name: "{{ dnsname }}"
      privatekey_path: "{{ pempath }}"
      privatekey_passphrase: "{{ private_key_password }}"
      passphrase: password
      certificate_path: "{{ crtpath }}"
      state: present

“You can’t run multiple commands in sudo” – and how to work around this

At work, we share tips and tricks, and one of my colleagues recently called me out on the following stanza I posted:

I like this [ansible] one for Debian based systems:
  - name: "Apt update, Full-upgrade, autoremove, autoclean"
    become: yes
    apt:
      upgrade: full
      update_cache: yes
      autoremove: yes
      autoclean: yes

And if you’re trying to figure out how to do that in Shell:
apt-get update && apt-get full-update -y && apt-get autoremove -y && apt-get autoclean -y

His response was “Surely you’re not logging into bash as root”. I said “I normally sudo -i as soon as I’ve logged in. I can’t recall offhand how one does a sudo for a string of command && command statements”

Well, as a result of this, I looked into it. Here’s one comment from the first Stack Overflow page I found:

You can’t run multiple commands from sudo – you always need to trick it into executing a shell which may accept multiple commands to run as parameters

So here are a few options on how to do that:

  1. sudo -s whoami \; whoami (link to answer)
  2. sudo sh -c "whoami ; whoami" (link to answer)
  3. But, my favourite is from this answer:

    An alternative using eval so avoiding use of a subshell: sudo -s eval 'whoami; whoami'

Why do I prefer the last one? Well, I already use eval for other purposes – mostly for starting my ssh-agent over SSH, like this: eval `ssh-agent` ; ssh-add

Setting UK keyboards in Vagrant Ubuntu Machines, using Ansible

Wow, now there’s a specific post title…

I use Ansible… quite a bit :) and one of the things I do with Ansible is to have a standard build desktop that I can create using Vagrant. Recently I upgraded the base to Ubuntu 18.04, and it annoyed me that I still didn’t have a working keyboard combination, so I kept getting US keyboards. I spent 20 minutes sorting it out, and here’s how to do it.

- name: Set keyboard layout
  debconf:
    name: "keyboard-configuration"
    question: "keyboard-configuration/{{ item.key }}"
    value: "{{ item.value }}"
    vtype: "{{ item.type|default('string') }}"
  with_items:
  - { key: "altgr", value: "The default for the keyboard layout", vtype: "select" }
  - { key: "compose", value: "No compose key", vtype: "select" }
  - { key: "ctrl_alt_bksp", value: "false", type: "boolean" }
  - { key: "variant", value: "English (UK)", vtype: "select" }
  - { key: "layout", value: "English (UK)", vtype: "select" }
  - { key: "model", value: "Generic 105-key PC (intl.)", vtype: "select" }

I posted how I got to this point over at the Server Fault post that got me most of the way. https://serverfault.com/a/912342/14832

Ansible Behaviour Change

For those of you who are working with #Ansible… Ansible 2.5 is out, and has an unusual documentation change around a key Ansible concept – `with_` loops Where you previously had:

with_dict: "{{ your_fact }}"
or
with_subelements:
- "{{ your_fact }}"
- some_subkey

This now should be written like this:

loop: "{{ lookup('dict', your_fact) }}"
and
loop: "{{ lookup('subelements', your_fact, 'some_subkey') }}"

Fear not, I hear you say, It’s fine, of course the documentation suggests that this is “how it’s always been”…… HA HA HA Nope. This behaviour is new as of 2.5, and needs ansible to be updated to the latest version. As far as I can tell, there’s no way to indicate to Ansible “Oh, BTW, this needs to be running on 2.5 or later”… so I wrote a role that does that for you.

ansible-galaxy install JonTheNiceGuy.version-check

You’re welcome :)

More useful URLs:

Creating OpenStack “Allowed Address Pairs” for Clusters with Ansible

This post came about after a couple of hours of iterations, so I can’t necessarily quote all the sources I worked from, but I’ll do my best!

In OpenStack (particularly in the “Kilo” release I’m working with), if you have a networking device that will pass traffic on behalf of something else (e.g. Firewall, IDS, Router, Transparent Proxy) you need to tell the virtual NIC that the interface is allowed to pass traffic for other IP addresses, as OpenStack applies by default a “Same Origin” firewall rule to the interface. Defining this in OpenStack is more complex than it could be, because for some reason, you can’t define 0.0.0.0/0 as this allowed address pair, so instead you have to define 0.0.0.0/1 and 128.0.0.0/1.

Here’s how you define those allowed address pairs (note, this assumes you’ve got some scaffolding in place to define things like “network_appliance”):

allowed_address_pairs: "{% if (item.0.network_appliance|default('false')|lower() == 'true') or (item.1.network_appliance|default('false')|lower() == 'true') %}[{'ip_address': '0.0.0.0/1'}, {'ip_address': '128.0.0.0/1'}]{% else %}{{ item.0.allowed_address_pairs|default(omit) }}{% endif %}"

OK, so we’ve defined the allowed address pairs! We can pass traffic across our firewall. But (and there’s always a but), the product I’m working with at the moment has a floating MAC address in a cluster, when you define an HA pair. They have a standard schedule for how each port’s floating MAC is assigned… so here’s what I’ve ended up with (and yes, I know it’s a mess!)

allowed_address_pairs: "{% if (item.0.network_appliance|default('false')|lower() == 'true') or (item.1.network_appliance|default('false')|lower() == 'true') %}[{'ip_address': '0.0.0.0/1'},{'ip_address': '128.0.0.0/1'}{% if item.0.ha is defined and item.0.ha != '' %}{% for vdom in range(0,40, 10) %},{'ip_address': '0.0.0.0/1','mac_address': '{{ item.0.floating_mac_prefix|default(item.0.image.floating_mac_prefix|default(floating_mac_prefix)) }}:{% if item.0.ha.group_id|default(0) < 16 %}0{% endif %}{{ '%0x' | format(item.0.ha.group_id|default(0)|int) }}:{% if vdom+(item.1.interface|default('1')|replace('port', '')|int)-1 < 16 %}0{% endif %}{{ '%0x' | format(vdom+(item.1.interface|default('1')|replace('port', '')|int)-1) }}'}, {'ip_address': '128.0.0.0/1','mac_address': '{{ item.0.floating_mac_prefix|default(item.0.image.floating_mac_prefix|default(floating_mac_prefix)) }}:{% if item.0.ha.group_id|default(0) < 16 %}0{% endif %}{{ '%0x' | format(item.0.ha.group_id|default(0)|int) }}:{% if vdom+(item.1.interface|default('0')|replace('port', '')|int)-1 < 16 %}0{% endif %}{{ '%0x' | format(vdom+(item.1.interface|default('1')|replace('port', '')|int)-1) }}'}{% endfor %}{% endif %}]{% else %}{{ item.0.allowed_address_pairs|default(omit) }}{% endif %}"

Let's break this down a bit. The vendor says that each port gets a standard prefix, (e.g. DE:CA:FB:AD) then the penultimate octet is the "Cluster ID" number in hex, and then the last octet is the sum of the port number (zero-indexed) added to a VDOM number, which increments in 10's. We're only allowed to assign 10 "allowed address pairs" to an interface, so I've got the two originals (which are assigned to "whatever" the defined mac address is of the interface), and four passes around. Other vendors (e.g. this one) do things differently, so I'll probably need to revisit this once I know how the next one (and the next one... etc.) works!

So, we have here a few parts to make that happen.

The penultimate octet, which is the group ID in hex needs to be two hex digits long, and without adding more python modules to our default machines, we can't use a "pad" filter (to add 0's to the beginning of the mac octets), so we do that by hand:

{% if item.0.ha.group_id|default(0) < 16 %}0{% endif %}

And here's how to convert the group ID into a hex number:

{{ '%0x' | format(item.0.ha.group_id|default(0)|int) }}

Then the next octet is the sum of the VDOM and PortID. First we need to loop around the VDOMs. We don't always know whether we're going to be adding VDOMs until after deployment has started, so here we will assume we've got 3 VDOMs (plus VDOM "0" for management) as it doesn't really matter if we don't end up using them. We create the vdom variable like this:

{% for vdom in range(0, 40, 10) %} STUFF {% endfor %}

We need to put the actual port ID in there too. As we're using a with_subelement loop we can't create an increment, but what we can do is ensure we're recording the interface number. This only works here because the vendor has a sequential port number (port1, port2, etc). We'll need to experiment further with other vendors! So, here's how we're doing this. We already know how to create a hex number, but we do need to use some other Jinja2 filters here:

{{ '%0x' | format(vdom+(item.1.interface|default('1')|replace('port', '')|int)-1) }}

Let's pull this apart a bit further. item.1.interface is the name of the interface, and if it doesn't exist (using the |default('1') part) we replace it with the string "1". So, let's replace that variable with a "normal" value.

{{ '%0x' | format(vdom+("port1"|replace('port', '')|int)-1) }}

Next, we need to remove the word "port" from the string "port1" to make it just "1", so we use the replace filter to strip part of that value out. Let's do that:

{{ '%0x' | format(vdom+("1"|int)-1) }}

After that, we need to turn the string "1" into the literal number 1:

{{ '%0x' | format(vdom+1-1) }}

We loop through vdom several times, but let's pick one instance of that at random - 30 (the fourth iteration of the vdom for-loop):

{{ '%0x' | format(30+1-1) }}

And then we resolve the maths:

{{ '%0x' | format(30) }}

And then the |format(30) turns the '%0x' into the value "1e"

Assuming the vendor prefix is, as I mentioned, 'de:ca:fb:ad:' and the cluster ID is 0, this gives us the following resulting allowed address pairs:

[
{"ip_address": "0.0.0.0/1"},
{"ip_address": "128.0.0.0/1"},
{"ip_address": "0.0.0.0/1", "mac_address": "de:ca:fb:ad:00:00"},
{"ip_address": "128.0.0.0/1", "mac_address": "de:ca:fb:ad:00:00"},
{"ip_address": "0.0.0.0/1", "mac_address": "de:ca:fb:ad:00:0a"},
{"ip_address": "128.0.0.0/1", "mac_address": "de:ca:fb:ad:00:0a"},
{"ip_address": "0.0.0.0/1", "mac_address": "de:ca:fb:ad:00:14"},
{"ip_address": "128.0.0.0/1", "mac_address": "de:ca:fb:ad:00:14"},
{"ip_address": "0.0.0.0/1", "mac_address": "de:ca:fb:ad:00:1e"},
{"ip_address": "128.0.0.0/1", "mac_address": "de:ca:fb:ad:00:1e"}
]

I hope this has helped you!

Sources of information:

Defining Networks with Ansible

In my day job, I’m using Ansible to provision networks in OpenStack. One of the complaints I’ve had about the way I now define them is that the person implementing the network has to spell out all the network elements – the subnet size, DHCP pool, the addresses of the firewalls and names of those items. This works for a manual implementation process, but is seriously broken when you try to hand that over to someone else to implement. Most people just want something which says “Here is the network I want to implement – 192.0.2.0/24″… and let the system make it for you.

So, I wrote some code to make that happen. It’s not perfect, and it’s not what’s in production (we have lots more things I need to add for that!) but it should do OK with an IPv4 network.

Hope this makes sense!

---
- hosts: localhost
  vars:
  - networks:
      # Defined as a subnet with specific router and firewall addressing
      external:
        subnet: "192.0.2.0/24"
        firewall: "192.0.2.1"
        router: "192.0.2.254"
      # Defined as an IP address and CIDR prefix, rather than a proper network address and CIDR prefix
      internal_1:
        subnet: "198.51.100.64/24"
      # A valid smaller network and CIDR prefix
      internal_2:
        subnet: "203.0.113.0/27"
      # A tiny CIDR network
      internal_3:
        subnet: "203.0.113.64/30"
      # These two CIDR networks are unusable for this environment
      internal_4:
        subnet: "203.0.113.128/31"
      internal_5:
        subnet: "203.0.113.192/32"
      # A massive CIDR network
      internal_6:
        subnet: "10.0.0.0/8"
  tasks:
  # Based on https://stackoverflow.com/a/47631963/5738 with serious help from mgedmin and apollo13 via #ansible on Freenode
  - name: Add router and firewall addressing for CIDR prefixes < 30     set_fact:       networks: >
        {{ networks | default({}) | combine(
          {item.key: {
            'subnet': item.value.subnet | ipv4('network'),
            'router': item.value.router | default((( item.value.subnet | ipv4('network') | ipv4('int') ) + 1) | ipv4),
            'firewall': item.value.firewall | default((( item.value.subnet | ipv4('broadcast') | ipv4('int') ) - 1) | ipv4),
            'dhcp_start': item.value.dhcp_start | default((( item.value.subnet | ipv4('network') | ipv4('int') ) + 2) | ipv4),
            'dhcp_end': item.value.dhcp_end | default((( item.value.subnet | ipv4('broadcast') | ipv4('int') ) - 2) | ipv4)
          }
        }) }}
    with_dict: "{{ networks }}"
    when: item.value.subnet | ipv4('prefix') < 30   - name: Add router and firewall addressing for CIDR prefixes = 30     set_fact:       networks: >
        {{ networks | default({}) | combine(
          {item.key: {
            'subnet': item.value.subnet | ipv4('network'),
            'router': item.value.router | default((( item.value.subnet | ipv4('network') | ipv4('int') ) + 1) | ipv4),
            'firewall': item.value.firewall | default((( item.value.subnet | ipv4('broadcast') | ipv4('int') ) - 1) | ipv4)
          }
        }) }}
    with_dict: "{{ networks }}"
    when: item.value.subnet | ipv4('prefix') == 30
  - debug:
      var: networks

Using inspec to test your ansible

Over the past few days I’ve been binge listening to the Arrested Devops podcast. In one of the recent episodes (“Career Change Into DevOps With Michael Hedgpeth, Annie Hedgpeth, And Megan Bohl (ADO102)“) one of the interviewees mentions that she got started in DevOps by using Inspec.

Essentially, inspec is a way of explaining “this is what my server must look like”, so you can then test these statements against a built machine… effectively letting you unit test your provisioning scripts.

I’ve already built a fair bit of my current personal project using Ansible, so I wasn’t exactly keen to re-write everything from scratch, but it did make me think that maybe I should have a common set of tests to see how close my server was to the hardening “Benchmark” guides from CIS… and that’s pretty easy to script in inspec, particularly as the tests in those documents list the “how to test” and “how to remediate” commands to execute.

These are in the process of being drawn up (so far, all I have is an inspec test saying “confirm you’re running on Ubuntu 16.04″… not very complex!!) but, from the looks of things, the following playbook would work relatively well!

---
- name: Make /testing path
  file:
    state: directory
    path: /testing
    owner: root
    group: root
- name: Copy tests to /testing
  copy:
    src: ../files/
    dest: /testing/
    owner: root
    group: root
- name: Ensure ruby is installed
  apt:
    name: "{{ item }}"
    state: present
  with_items:
  - ruby
  - ruby-dev
  - build-essential
  - libffi-dev
- name: Ensure inspec is installed
  gem:
    name: inspec
    state: present
    user_install: no
- name: Run inspec tests
  command: inspec exec /testing